‘Born British, brought up Nigerian: London attackers’ identity crisis’ | A. Ajayi- Haaretz

‘Born British, brought up Nigerian: London attackers’ identity crisis’ | A. Ajayi- Haaretz

But immigration narratives all too often focus on the successes. A truer picture of Nigerian immigration to the United Kingdom can be found in the lower-middle class and working class neighborhoods of north and south-east London: First-generation migrants grappling with the vicissitudes of an uncertain economic and social landscape, second-generation migrants searching for a true sense of self-identity. Many older Nigerians regularly attend church, either the established branches of the main denominations or, increasingly, a network of small but successful evangelical Christian churches, run by similarly-minded Nigerian transplants. Religion, in this case, creates a reassuringly conservative framework as well as a sense of community. A common complaint of the first generation is the challenge of bringing up children in the comparatively permissive social environment of the United Kingdom. It is fair to observe that many Nigerians of this generation subscribe to a more robust model of child-rearing, refusing to spare the rod and trying hard not to spoil the child. In the U.K., the thinking goes, the opposite prevails.

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