‘Much of the rhetoric concerning the British fortunes at Eurovision reflects growing Euroscepticism’ | P. Jordan- LSE

‘Much of the rhetoric concerning the British fortunes at Eurovision reflects growing Euroscepticism’ | P. Jordan- LSE

The UK has undoubtedly fared poorly over the past decade or so. It is interesting to observe some of these debates, which often reflect wider debates concerning Britain’s place in Europe, namely the EU. The British have a cynical attitude, dismissing the contest as ridiculous whilst perpetuating the myth that Europe simply doesn’t like the UK. Could it be the case that there are other issues at play here? The relaxation of the language rules in 1999 immediately saw a decline in the fortunes of the UK, Ireland and Malta, all of whom performed in English at Eurovision whilst every other competing nation had to perform in their native language. The contest has significantly expanded and the inclusion of the public telephone vote has also saw voting blocs appear. However, voting blocs have always been a part of Eurovision. I think it’s far too easy to blame politics on the UK’s lack of success in recent times. The UK and Ireland vote for each other too so perhaps the British shouldn’t be decrying the actions of others so quickly. I would argue that essentially the UK hasn’t been good enough and when the BBC has made an effort, they have been rewarded. In 2009 the UK’s Jade Ewen, performing Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Dianne Warren’s “My Time” came 5th. In 2011 Blue came 5th in the public vote and due to a poor showing with the juries, 11th overall.

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